TRAVELING THIS HOLIDAY? BE SAFE THIS NEW YEAR’S EVE WITH YOUR PET!

food spread

Chocolate and alcohol may seem like necessities during a New Year’s Eve party, but they’re actually quite dangerous for our pets. As always, if you suspect your pet has eaten any of the following foods, please note the amount ingested and contact us or the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center at (888) 426-4435.

◾Chocolate, Coffee, Caffeine These products all contain substances called methylxanthines, which are found in cacao seeds, the fruit of the plant used to make coffee and in the nuts of an extract used in some sodas. When ingested by pets, methylxanthines can cause vomiting and diarrhea, panting, excessive thirst and urination, hyperactivity, abnormal heart rhythm, tremors, seizures and even death. Note that darker chocolate is more dangerous than milk chocolate. White chocolate has the lowest level of methylxanthines, while baking chocolate contains the highest.
◾Alcohol Alcoholic beverages and food products containing alcohol can cause vomiting, diarrhea, decreased coordination, central nervous system depression, difficulty breathing, tremors, abnormal blood acidity, coma and even death.

BE SAFE THIS NEW YEAR’S EVE WITH YOUR PETS!

Chocolate and alcohol may seem like necessities during a New Year’s Eve party, but they’re actually quite dangerous for our animal companions. As always, if you suspect your pet has eaten any of the following foods, please note the amount ingested and contact us or the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center at (888) 426-4435.

– Chocolate, Coffee, Caffeine
These products all contain substances called methylxanthines, which are found in cacao seeds, the fruit of the plant used to make coffee and in the nuts of an extract used in some sodas. When ingested by pets, methylxanthines can cause vomiting and diarrhea, panting, excessive thirst and urination, hyperactivity, abnormal heart rhythm, tremors, seizures and even death. Note that darker chocolate is more dangerous than milk chocolate. White chocolate has the lowest level of methylxanthines, while baking chocolate contains the highest.

– Alcohol
Alcoholic beverages and food products containing alcohol can cause vomiting, diarrhea, decreased coordination, central nervous system depression, difficulty breathing, tremors, abnormal blood acidity, coma and even death.

Paradise Pet Hotel Pet Travel Tip: Traveling With Your Rabbit

Travel can be quite stressful for rabbits, but preparing well ahead of time will help the trip go much smoother, and most rabbits do fine as long as a few precautions are taken.

  1. Invest in a good carrier. If your rabbit cage fits in your vehicle, your rabbit can travel this way, but most cages take up too much room. Some people use carriers meant for dogs and cats, although it can be awkward to get your rabbit in an out of a front-opening carrier. You may want to invest in a rabbit travel carrier, which usually are top and front opening and easier to manage. Make sure you get one big enough for your rabbit. Allow your rabbit to get used to the carrier, first by allowing your rabbit to explore the carrier on its own (just put it on the floor during playtime, and put a few favorite treats inside). After a while, put your rabbit in the carrier for a few minutes at a time, with a favorite treat or toy.
  2. Prepare your rabbit for the ride with some practice runs. Start out with short trips in the car, and work up to longer (30 minutes – one hour) trips. This will help get your rabbit used to both the carrier and the sensation of riding in a moving vehicle. Your rabbit may already be used to short drives, but it is still a good idea to take a few longer drives to get your rabbit used to longer trips. If at all possible, use a seatbelt to secure the carrier.
  3. Plan ahead. Pack extra food (same as the rabbit normally eats), water from home and a water bottle that can attach to the carrier, and some favorite treats. Get a health certificate from your vet, and consier getting your rabbit microchipped in case he or she gets away on you. If you need to make stops along the way, find hotels ahead of time that will let your rabbit stay too. Also pack some cleaning supplies like paper towels and vinegar for any messes or spills. Place a blanket or cardboard over the seats in the vehicle where the carrier will sit to protect from any stress-induced urine spraying.

Paradise Pet Hotel Pet Travel Tip: Dogs and Boats

Dogs usually like water. Som­e breeds, like Labrador retrievers, are traditional boat dogs. But that doesn’t mean you can take them on boats without considering their safety and well-being.

Many dog owners assume their pets can swim, but a short doggy paddle in the pond is a far cry from swimming through strong currents in open waters. Your dog may not be strong enough or fast enough to swim alongside your boat. Leaner dogs may struggle more, since fat is more buoyant than muscle. Short-legged breeds can also have problems swimming.

Some dogs can’t wait to get into the water. That makes them great boating companions, but those waterlogged pups can also pose safety risks. Make sure your dog is securely leashed when you first get on board. The other end of the leash should be in your hand, not tied to the boat. The dog should know you’re in control and that you’re close by. Once you’ve made all the necessary preparations for departure from the dock, you can reward your dog with a swim

Paradise Pet Hotel Pet Travel Tip: Make Sure Your Cat is Healthy Before You Travel

Within 10 days of your departure, visit your vet’s office for a check-up to ensure that your pet is healthy enough to travel with you. Your cat needs to be up-to-date on her shots, and you should get written proof of her health with a signed health certificate (also called a Certificate of Veterinary Inspection) and vaccination status (including rabies vaccine status) to take with you.

Paradise Pet Hotel Pet Travel Tip: Poop Bags

Always bring extra poop bags with you when you travel!!! Keep them in your glove compartment and in your suitcase.

The 2013 Calendars Are Now Available From the Baltimore Humane Society!

Baltimore Humane Society Calendar

The 2013 calendar features stunning and sweet images of pets adopted from the Baltimore Humane Society, by Mary Swift Photography. It makes a great stocking stuffer, Chanukah gift, or Secret Santa gift for any animal lover!

Get a prized holiday gift and help homeless pets too!! ONLY $15 plus $2 shipping and handling.

For more information about how to purchase the calendar, go to: http://www.bmorehumane.org/component/content/article/465

 

Paradise Pet Hotel Pet Travel Tip: Car Safety

Don’t let your dog or cat ride in your lap in the front seat. Let them find a comfortable and safe spot in a back seat or keep your pet in a carrier to prevent them from roaming around the car and distracting you while driving.